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Travel Guide to Venice

  • Italy
  • Venice
  • 44 km²
  • EUR
  • Italian
  • 262 thousand
  • BEATI I ULTIMI SE I PRIMI GÀ CREANSA – Blessed the last ones if the first ones are well educated! A bit ironic, but so true!

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    Venetian Proverb
  • Venice is like eating an entire box of chocolate liqueurs in one go.

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    Truman Capote
  • A realist, in Venice, would become a romantic by mere faithfulness to what he saw before him..

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    Arthur Symons

General Information About Venice

A floating Masterpiece...Imagine the audacity of building a city of marble palaces on a lagoon – and that was only the start. Never was a thoroughfare so aptly named as the Grand Canal, reflecting the glories of centuries of Venetian architecture in the 50 palazzi and six churches lining its banks. At the end of Venice’s signature S-shaped waterway, the Palazzo Ducale and Basilica di San Marco add double exclamation points. But wait until you see what’s hiding in the narrow backstreets: neighbourhood churches lined with Veroneses and priceless marbles, convents graced with ethereal Bellinis, Tiepolo’s glimpses of heaven on homeless-shelter ceilings, and a single Titian painting that mysteriously lights up an entire basilica. Garden islands and lagoon aquaculture yield speciality produce and seafood you won’t find elsewhere – all highlighted in inventive Venetian cuisine, with tantalising traces of ancient spice routes. The city knows how to put on a royal spread, as France’s King Henry III once found out when faced with 1200 dishes and 200 bonbons. Today such feasts are available in miniature at happy hour, when bars mount lavish spreads of cicheti (Venetian tapas). Save room and time for a proper sit-down Venetian meal, with lagoon seafood to match views at canalside bistros and toasts with Veneto’s signature bubbly, prosecco.

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History

Uniquely among Italy’s chief cities, Venice came into being after the fall of the Roman Empire in the West. The Lombard hordes, whose incursions into northern Italy began in AD 568, drove great numbers of mainlanders onto the islands of the lagoon, previously the homes of itinerant fishermen and salt workers. The isolated communities, literally islands of Veneto-Byzantine civilization, became part of the exarchate of Ravenna when it was created in 584. When the mainland Byzantine city of Oderzo fell to the Lombards in 641, political authority was shifted to one of the islands in the Venetian lagoon. The first elected doge, or duke, was Orso, chosen in an anti-Byzantine military declaration in 727, but he was succeeded by Byzantine officials until about 751, when the exarchate of Ravenna came to an end. There followed decades of internal political strife among various settlements vying for supremacy and between pro- and anti-Byzantine factions; also involved were attempts by church authorities to acquire temporal influence. Finally the doge Obelerio and his brother Beato formed an alliance with the Franks of Italy and placed Venice under the authority of the Italian king Pippin (died 810) in order to free themselves from Byzantine control. Pro-Byzantine reaction to this event under the doges of the Parteciaco family led to the transfer of the seat of government to the Rialto group of islands, by then the centre for exiles in the factional fighting. Though a Franco-Byzantine treaty of 814 guaranteed to Venice political and juridical independence from the rule of the Western Empire, it did not confirm any effective dependence on the Byzantine Empire, and by 840–841 the doge was negotiating international agreements in his own name. The unusual legal and political position of the small independent duchy, situated in territorial isolation between two great empires, contributed greatly to its function as a trading intermediary. A long succession of serious disputes between leading families concerning the office of doge did not halt the rapid development of trade. Increase in private wealth led to the gradual achievement of internal stability by creating a broader ruling class that was capable of putting a limit to the power of the doge. Gradually a national consciousness developed. Beginning in the late 9th century, the doges were chosen by popular election, though the right was frequently abused during times of civil strife. Finally the group of Rialto islands was solemnly transformed into the city of Venice (civitas Venetiarum).

Venice Nightlife

Pity the day trippers dropped off at San Marco with a mere three hours to take in Venice. That’s about enough time for one long gasp at the show-stopper that is Piazza San Marco, but not nearly enough time to see what else Venice is hiding. Stay longer in this fairy-tale city and you’ll discover the pleasures of la bea vita (the beautiful life) that only locals know: the wake-up call of the gondoliers' ‘Ooooeeeee!’, a morning spritz in a sunny campo (square), lunch in a crowded bacaro (bar) with friends and fuschia-pink sunsets that have sent centuries of artists mad. Once you find a place to step out of the foot traffic and “get lost,” a night in Venice, Italy can best be described as dreamlike. Each evening, Lisa and I found ourselves walking hand-in-hand through its famous narrow alleyways, blissfully buzzed from a bottle of red wine and deep in conversation. Staying off the beaten path, we were often alone to nothing more than the echoes of our footsteps and a backdrop of lapping water in the canals. It was beautiful, serene, and incredibly romantic.

Popular Bars in Venice

 
Cafe al Fontego
Campo Santa Margherita Tel. : +39 (0)
 
Mezzopieno
Cannaregio District Tel. : +39 (0)
 
Venice Jazz Club
Campo Santa Margherita Tel. : +39 (0)
 
Al Vapore
Mestre Tel. : +39 (0)

Famous Clubs in Venice

 
Tag Club
Mestre Tel. : +39 (0)
 
Molocinque
Mestre Tel. : +39 (0)
 
Aurora Beach Club
The Lido Tel. : +39 (0)
 
Piccolo Mondo
Campo Santa Margherita Tel. : +39 (0)

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Ca’ Sagredo Hotel
Venice Italy

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Hotel Ca' Sagredo is an elegant, 14th-century building overlooking the Grand Canal. It features typically Venetian lavish décor. Rooms have antique furniture and original works of art. Set in a tranquil area of Venice, the property is a 7-minute walk from the Rialto Bridge. St. Mark’s Basilica can be reached with a pleasant 15-minute stroll.

avg/night€195.00 SELECT
en_GB